Another Note on Fiber

Another Note on Fiber

The fiber in real food is of two kinds: soluble, which is globular (e.g. beta-glucan, pectin, inulin, etc.); and insoluble, which is stringy (e.g. psyllium, cellulose, chitin, etc.). You need both, as they do different jobs. The insoluble fiber forms a latticework (like a fishing net) in the duodenum, and the soluble fiber plugs the holes in that latticework. Together they form a secondary barrier on the inside of the duodenum, which prevents early absorption of mono- and di-saccharides, as well as other readily absorbable nutrients.

Psyllium is an insoluble fiber. Alone It could form the latticework, but not plug the holes. Beta-glucan is a soluble fiber. It can swell and absorb water, but could not lay down the scaffolding. To get the benefits on delay of absorption, you would need both. Real food has both. Ingestion of either psyllium alone or beta-glucan alone could not form the secondary barrier. You need both. Could you put both into one pill? Perhaps. But the side-effects would be highly problematic.

Psyllium is not compressible, so in order to lay down the latticework for creation of the duodenal barrier, you would have to take a high dose of psyllium. Furthermore, psyllium leads to loose stools, which is not disastrous, but is not pleasant. Beta-glucan swells with exposure to water and does not release the water causing severe bloating, distress, and diarrhea. It does not absorb macronutrients, just water. Furthermore, neither fiber gives up the water it absorbs, resulting in problematic and persistent GI distress. 

Intact fiber – as a whole food – has many benefits. Not just the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). In the processed food industry, the “germ” of the grain (the nucleic acids, flavinoids, polyphenols) is removed with the fiber. Keeping the fiber also means keeping the germ intact. 

Cardiologist slams Government Dietary Advice in Parliamentary Speech

Cardiologist slams Government Dietary Advice in Parliamentary Speech

Dr. Aseem Malhotra addressed the European Parliament on February 26, 2019 – see the video recording to on the left side of this screen. You may view his powerpoint here as well.

“The science of reversing type 2 diabetes with a low carbohydrate diet (and overcoming opposition from vested interests)”

Aseem Malhotra Parliament Talk

Dr. Aseem Malhotra
Honorary Consultant Cardiologist, Lister Hospital Stevenage
Academy of Medical Royal Colleges Choosing Wisely Steering Group
King’s Fund – Member of Board of Trustees

(With special thanks to Professor Sir Muir Gray, Dr. Robert Lustig, Professor Simon Capewell, Dr. Kevin Hall, and Dr. David Unwin)

Dr. Malhotra pulls no punches.

“This evening I had the honor of speaking In parliament to a packed audience of MPs, lords, healthcare practitioners, and members of the public including Dr. Michael Moseley. There were no holds barred in calling out dietary misinformation coming from the establishment including Public Health England, ignorant scientists and the British Dietetic Association. Evidence based medicine has been hijacked by commercial influence but we have the solutions to fix this broken system and we must. It was also a pleasure to meet with a very receptive and friendly Secretary of State for health who was delighted to receive a copy of the Pioppi Diet. He also promised he would watch my talk and that of Dr. Zoe Harcombe that has been recorded by Ivor Cummins for you all to see soon. Special thank you to Tom Watson and Keith Vaz for making this happen!”

-Dr. Aseem Malhotra

Intro by MP Tom Watson

Child Hacked?

Child Hacked?

Two Presentations with Dr. Lustig offered by the New Jersey Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Academy of Pediatrics, New Jersey Chapter offered April 12, 2019 in East Brunswick, NJ

Tooth Decay and Liver Decay

Mountain Dew Mouth has been the scourge of dentists for decades. But there’s a new disease which affects even more people: Mountain Dew Liver. Non-Alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) wasn’t even discovered until 1980; and now up to 1/3 of Americans suffer from it. Especially children – 13% of autopsies in children show NAFLD; and 38% of of obese children. Both tooth decay and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease rates have increasing. And excessive sugar consumption explains both.

Dietary sugar is composed of one molecule each of glucose and fructose. It is the fructose that is the primary driver of both diseases. While glucose contributes to the oral biofilm, fructose doesn’t. It is metabolized by oral bacteria into lactic acid, which readily diffuses though the biofilm and into the tooth. Alternatively, fructose gets turned into fat in the liver mitochondria, which drives NAFLD, which is the leading cause of liver transplantation now, surpassing alcohol. And yet who is most susceptible to both diseases? Children, because they are the biggest sugar consumers.

Doctors and dentists must be united in supporting public health measures to reduce chronic disease. Altering our diet is where public health prevention starts.

The Hacking of the American Child

Everyone is looking down. But especially kids. There is something unnatural about a 15 month old using an iPad to soothe himself or herself. Everyone assumes this is just the natural progression of our “tech society.” But what if this is doing harm to us, and to our brains? And what if children are more vulnerable than adults? Numerous politicians are calling for “reigning in” of the internet. Is this necessary?

We will answer five questions:

1) Is there such a thing as Tech Addiction?

2) Is it similar to or different than drug addiction?

3) Does technology lead to depression and suicide?

4) Have our minds been hacked?

5) Are children more at more risk?

The answers to these questions provide us a blueprint to harness technology for good, and not for ill.

More Information

http://njaap.org/calendar/day-with-dr-lustig-a-two-presentation-seminar/

The ADA just released its new guidelines for pediatric type 2 diabetes…

The ADA just released its new guidelines for pediatric type 2 diabetes…

The ADA just released its new guidelines for pediatric type 2 diabetes.
 
 
The ADA just doesn’t get it. And I’m worried they never will.
 
Directly from the document:
 
“In youth-onset type 2 diabetes, the major modifiable risk factors are obesity and lifestyle habits of excess nutritional intake, low physical activity, and increased sedentary behaviors with decreased energy expenditure, resulting in the surplus of energy being stored as body fat.”
 
Their own words — it’s still about calories in, calories out. And in the nutrition section, it’s about weight loss and management. The words “diet” or “sugar” or “processed food” aren’t even mentioned. Forget that our group turned insulin resistance around in children just by  getting rid of liver fat by replacing sugar with starch. Forget that Virta Health has reversed Type 2 diabetes with a ketogenic diet, to the point where they are changing their business model to put their profits “at risk” based on diabetes reversal.

 

Worst yet, the authors are my Pediatric Endocrine academic colleagues. They should know better. I’m supremely disappointed in them.

 
 
The ADA is a “bought” organization. Bought by Big Pharma. It’s only about the money. It’s not about lives or health or society. This is extortion. Big Food is Al Capone. And the ADA is Frank Nitti, his henchman (photo above).
Butter Battle 2.0

Butter Battle 2.0

The Guardian enters “The Butter Battle 2.0”.  More heat than light.

Here are the 10 things everyone need to know to navigate this minefield.

  1. LDL-Cholesterol (LDL-C) levels (from dietary fat) correlate (but poorly) with CV mortality.
  2. Triglyceride levels (from dietary sugar) correlate (much better) with CV mortality.
  3. LDL particle number (LDL-P) is the right measure for CVD, and higher is worse. But a standard lipid profile measures LDL-C, not LDL-P. Wrong test.
  4. Dietary fat raises LDL-C, but not necessarily LDL-P, while sugar raises triglyceride levels.
  5. Red meat is associated with increased CVD. But maybe not because of its saturated fat. In fact, dairy saturated fat is protective against CVD.
  6. If you have a super high LDL-C (over 200), then you probably also have a high LDL-P, and you might need a statin.
  7. If your LDL-C is between 70 and 200, maybe your LDL-P is high, but maybe it is not. Statins are not prescribed based on LDL-P; they are prescribed based on LDL-C. This is a bad idea, yet doctors do it all the time.
  8. 4/5 of the people taking statins were prescribed for high LDL-C. But this is the wrong reason. And 20% of statin takers get side-effects.
  9. That doesn’t mean you should stop your statin. But it also doesn’t mean you can eat butter without abandon. 
  10. A doctor who knows what they are doing can figure your situation out. But most don’t know what they are doing; they do as they’re told.

Reference: