IMMH Conference

IMMH Conference

Very pleased to be supporting IMMH at the 11th annual Integrative Medicine for Mental Health Conference, August 20-23, at the historic Hilton Chicago on Michigan Avenue. This four-day international conference will give practitioners a holistic approach to successfully diagnose and treat underlying issues contributing to the symptoms of neurological, behavioral, and psychiatric disorders.

IMMH is the only conference annually dedicated to integrative medicine for mental health, which is brain health.

IMMH will soon be announcing all of the speakers for IMMH 2020. Details, including registration available at www.IMMH2020.com. Stay tuned for updates.

In the meantime, check out the highlight video from this year’s IMMH Conference:

 

Sugar in 2020

Sugar in 2020

Happy New Year!

Hopefully, your new year is off to a healthy start.

You may have seen the New York Time article by By :

and her follow-up piece:

This recent interview with Robin Young (@hereandnowrobin) on Here and Now (@hereandnow/@NPR) references Tara Parker-Pope’s story:

Addicted To Sugar? This Doctor Says It’s ‘The New Tobacco’

I’m in Paris on sabbatical, but if you happen to be in or near San Francisco on January 15th, don’t miss this event at UCSF with my colleagues:

Blood Sugar Health Salon Discussion
1-15-20, 7-8:30pm
Using new tech to prevent chronic
#MetabolicDisease rather than just manage it.
Featuring
Dr. Aaron Neinstein @AaronNeinstein (@UCSF
Dr. Carolyn Jasik / @DrJasik (@omadahealth)
Jessie Inchauspe @jessie_inc_

Hosted by: Hypoglycemia Support Foundation (@Hypoglycemia101) & the UCSF AME Center (@UCSFAME)

Details/RSVP: hypoglycemia.org/salons

All the best to you in this new year.

 

 

 

Sabbatical 2020

Sabbatical 2020

Happy New Decade, everyone!

It’s not a secret that children (and really all of society) this past decade have become addicted, depressed, anxious, distracted, and angry.

The question is why. I’m going out on a limb here. We now have two dopamine stimulators that we freely and willingly give to kids — sugar and technology. But the genie is out of the bottle. We have to find a way to peacefully co-exist with these problems, and we have to teach children how to manage them.

For the next six-months, I’m going on sabbatical in Paris, where I will be bridging two academic units — the Center for Research and Interdisciplinarity (https://www.cri-paris.org/en) and the neurocybernetics lab of ETIS (Information Processing and Systems Teams) at the Université de Cergy-Pontoise  (https://perso-etis.ensea.fr/neurocyber/web/en/) to develop a curriculum and materials to help combat addiction in 9-11 year old children.

Wish me luck! I’ll need it! 

Hyper-Palatable Foods

Hyper-Palatable Foods

“betcha can’t eat just one!”

“A popular U.S. brand of potato chips once promoted itself with the slogan, “betcha can’t eat just one!” Maybe that’s because potato chips, like so many foods in the American diet, can pack a mix of ingredients apt to light up people’s brain-reward neural circuitry and overpower mechanisms that are supposed to signal when we’ve had enough to eat. Researchers call this class of foods — often processed foods or sweets with alluring combinations of fat, sugar, carbohydrates and sodium — “hyper-palatable.” While a slew of films, popular books and academic studies have addressed hyper-palatable foods over the past 15 or so years, none has yet to offer a broadly accepted quantitative definition of just what constitutes a hyper-palatable food.”

New research offers specific metrics that might qualify foods as hyper-palatable — and finds most foods consumed in the United States meet these criteria.

Article: Data-driven definition of unhealthy yet pervasive ‘hyper-palatable’ foods

Research Paper in Obesity: Hyper‐Palatable Foods: Development of a Quantitative Definition and Application to the US Food System Database

“Extensive research has focused on hyper‐palatable foods (HPF); however, HPF are defined using descriptive terms (e.g., fast foods, sweets), which are not standardized and lack specificity. The study purpose was to develop a quantitative definition of HPF and apply the definition to the Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies (FNDDS) to determine HPF prevalence in the US food system.”

“The study is the first to provide a quantitative definition of HPF to be used as a starting point for future research. Given the immense contributions of HPF to obesity risk and related health conditions, it is imperative that the research community develop and validate a specific, quantitative definition of HPF that will advance the field’s understanding of potential mechanisms that may drive overeating and obesity. The HPF definition may also be an asset to inform future food policy work. A major barrier to policy legislation on HPF is that there is no precise definition to inform regulation, and it is not feasible to limit or restrict entire categories of foods (e.g., desserts). Given the ways in which HPF are integrated into our existing food system, strong and specific scientific evidence will be needed to dislodge and eventually regulate some of the most problematic foods that are associated with extensive disease and disability in the US. The HPF definition and quantitative criteria presented in this study represent a crucial first step in this process.”

Article: Study offers data-driven definition of unhealthy yet pervasive ‘hyper-palatable’ foods

“Fazzino and her KU coauthors — Kaitlyn Rohde, research assistant at the Cofrin Logan Center and Debra K. Sullivan of the Department of Dietetics and Nutrition at the University of Kansas Medical Center — sought to define criteria for hyperpalatable foods by conducting a literature review, and then using nutrition software and applying their definition to 7,757 food items in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies (FNDDS).”

Sales Ban on SSBs Makes an Impact

Sales Ban on SSBs Makes an Impact

Association of a Workplace Sales Ban on Sugar-Sweetened Beverages With Employee Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Health by Elissa S. Epel, PhDAlison Hartman, BALaurie M. Jacobs, PhDCindy Leung, ScD, MPHMichael A. Cohn, PhDLeeane Jensen, MPHLaura Ishkanian, MPHJanet Wojcicki, PhD, MPHAshley E. Mason, PhDRobert H. Lustig, MD, MSLKimber L. Stanhope, PhD, MS, RD Laura A. Schmidt, PhD, MSW, MPH

In this before-after study and trial that included 214 adults who regularly drank SSBs, participants reported consuming less SSBs after a workplace sales ban and a reduction in waist circumference and sagittal diameter but no change in body mass index or insulin sensitivity. Those randomized to receive a brief motivational intervention had greater improvements.

“As rates of cardiometabolic diseases continue to rise, private employers are likely to face greater productivity losses and private health expenditures. The results of this study suggest that workplace SSB sales bans, if widely adopted, could add another layer of efficacy to existing SSB reduction strategies. At the societal level, private sector–driven change through workplace sales bans seems to offer a strategy that complements existing governmental reform efforts. Although effective, governmental reform policies, such as SSB taxation and warning labels, face significant political obstacles that private-sector sales bans do not.”


Articles about the Study

UCSF Banned Sugary Drink Sales, Here Is What Happened Next, Forbes

Doctors call on workplaces to ban sale of sugary drinks, The Guardian

Workplace sugary-drink ban helps employees cut back, Reuters

 

Subscribe for news and updates...

Join this mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from Dr. Robert Lustig.

You have Successfully Subscribed!