The ADA just released its new guidelines for pediatric type 2 diabetes…

The ADA just released its new guidelines for pediatric type 2 diabetes…

The ADA just released its new guidelines for pediatric type 2 diabetes.
 
 
The ADA just doesn’t get it. And I’m worried they never will.
 
Directly from the document:
 
“In youth-onset type 2 diabetes, the major modifiable risk factors are obesity and lifestyle habits of excess nutritional intake, low physical activity, and increased sedentary behaviors with decreased energy expenditure, resulting in the surplus of energy being stored as body fat.”
 
Their own words — it’s still about calories in, calories out. And in the nutrition section, it’s about weight loss and management. The words “diet” or “sugar” or “processed food” aren’t even mentioned. Forget that our group turned insulin resistance around in children just by  getting rid of liver fat by replacing sugar with starch. Forget that Virta Health has reversed Type 2 diabetes with a ketogenic diet, to the point where they are changing their business model to put their profits “at risk” based on diabetes reversal.

 

Worst yet, the authors are my Pediatric Endocrine academic colleagues. They should know better. I’m supremely disappointed in them.

 
 
The ADA is a “bought” organization. Bought by Big Pharma. It’s only about the money. It’s not about lives or health or society. This is extortion. Big Food is Al Capone. And the ADA is Frank Nitti, his henchman (photo above).
Butter Battle 2.0

Butter Battle 2.0

The Guardian enters “The Butter Battle 2.0”.  More heat than light.

Here are the 10 things everyone need to know to navigate this minefield.

  1. LDL-Cholesterol (LDL-C) levels (from dietary fat) correlate (but poorly) with CV mortality.
  2. Triglyceride levels (from dietary sugar) correlate (much better) with CV mortality.
  3. LDL particle number (LDL-P) is the right measure for CVD, and higher is worse. But a standard lipid profile measures LDL-C, not LDL-P. Wrong test.
  4. Dietary fat raises LDL-C, but not necessarily LDL-P, while sugar raises triglyceride levels.
  5. Red meat is associated with increased CVD. But maybe not because of its saturated fat. In fact, dairy saturated fat is protective against CVD.
  6. If you have a super high LDL-C (over 200), then you probably also have a high LDL-P, and you might need a statin.
  7. If your LDL-C is between 70 and 200, maybe your LDL-P is high, but maybe it is not. Statins are not prescribed based on LDL-P; they are prescribed based on LDL-C. This is a bad idea, yet doctors do it all the time.
  8. 4/5 of the people taking statins were prescribed for high LDL-C. But this is the wrong reason. And 20% of statin takers get side-effects.
  9. That doesn’t mean you should stop your statin. But it also doesn’t mean you can eat butter without abandon. 
  10. A doctor who knows what they are doing can figure your situation out. But most don’t know what they are doing; they do as they’re told.

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